Welcome To Luke's Page

Luke Ferrell is a New Jersey based theatre teaching artist and stage director and an undergraduate theatre arts, history, and education student at Rutger University. He has extensive experience in teaching students ages 6-18 in the areas of acting, musical theater, and technical theatre. Luke has directed several productions both at his university and in community theatre and educational theatre programs. His unique approach to stage direction includes a collaborative process of crafting in which the actor engages in a variety of exercises to gain a comprehensive understanding of the world of the character in the context of the actor's own experience and truth. Luke primarily aligns his instruction and coaching with the American Stanislavski System of acting but sees the value in drawing on a variety of acting methodologies to best cater to the most effective and truthful portrayal of the work.

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class plan

Musicool Theater

Fall Semester

Week

Session Topic/Theme

Class Structure 

Students will do & learn: 

Materials needed 

1

Introduction to Musical Theater

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Defining theater and musical theater, watching a live performance and beginning to think about “objectives”

Closing: Discuss the importance of warm-ups for the actor, go through a few warm-ups and the purpose of each exercise for the body

 

2

Acting Technique (Part 1): The Three C’s of Acting, Identity, and Point-Of-View

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Define “point-of-view” and discuss the importance of feeling as an actor, finding an object of importance and discussing feelings towards it

Closing: Implement point-of-view into theater games and exercises beginning to think about character and crafting

 

Acting Technique (Part 2): Objectives and Actions

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Define objective and look at examples of objectives in musical theater songs and scenes, define action and play games that demonstrate achieving objectives through meaningful actions

Closing: Begin to apply objectives and actions in scenes and character work

 

4

Crafting Characters

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

List favorite fictional characters and qualities that make them believable, list favorite actors and qualities that make them a “good” actor

Content: Outline the process for developing a character, tap into introductory acting technique to craft and portray meaningful and truthful character work

Closing: Revisit scene work focusing in on crafting more truthful characters, introduce individual character work in the context of the students’ selected songs

 

5

Improvisation

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Determine rules and conventions for improvisation, play improv games to get comfortable with improvisation with some basic circumstances

Closing: Craft circumstances and improvise a scene within those circumstances

 

6

Body and Movement

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-upDevelop and practice a readiness ritual as a means to ground the actor, demonstrate actor neutral as a starting place for any moment, discuss the importance of body and movement for the actor

Content: Practice proper breathing and the avoidance of cooling breaths, discuss breath in the context of the character, understand the role that the face plays in singing and acting, discuss the 360-degree actor and practice spatial awareness, demonstrate the different postures and stances of the actor and its connection to vulnerability

Closing: Exercise purposeful moments and gestures through an exercise, and apply meaningful moments to the student’s selected song

 

7

Musical Theater Dance

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Determine the role of dance in a musical, watch quality examples of musical theatre dance and analyze their purpose in the context of the show, stretch and prepare the body for dance

Content: Learn a short combination to a classic musical theatre piece and analyze the different movements as a means of storytelling

Closing: Reflect on the three components of musical theatre: acting, dance, and voice and discuss how the three are employed in storytelling

 

8

Scene Work

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Discuss how to read and act a scene using acting technique, watch quality performances of short scenes, and critique the actors’ portrayals of the characters

Closing: Rehearse and perform selected scenes in pairs and groups, critique and evaluate class scenes

 

9

Design for Theater

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Activate prior knowledge by listing the various roles that go into bringing a production to the stage, build a class list of the steps in a production process from start to finish

Content: Discuss the production and design process, view examples of quality scenic art and discuss the effect of the work on the quality of the show, sketch the character that the student portrays in their song, share sketches with the class 

Closing: Perform the student’s selected piece using props and costumes of their choosing, determine the role of scenic elements in their performance

Students should have a pen or pencil and paper ready for sketching.

10

Music: Rhythm and Melody

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Discuss music genres and musical theatre forms, share favorite music and artists and evaluate what makes music appealing, activate prior knowledge of music theory

Closing: Learn how to read musical notation and important indications to the actor noted in sheet music and how to implement these ornaments, evaluate examples of sheet music for musical theatre classics

 

11

Voice and Vocal Technique

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-upUse the continuum model for expressive singing and dynamics, execute vocal warm ups and discuss the importance of warming up the voice, implement proper singing posture and technique

Content: Discuss the use of microphones and the difference between musical theatre and pop singing, discuss vocal range, evaluate “types” and stereotypes in theatre

Closing: Apply basic vocal technique and posture to the student’s selected song

 

12

Lyrics and Initial Reactions

Intro: Teacher introduction, student introductions, name game, “news report” to talk about something that happened this week, Broadway show of the week, body warm-up

Content: Introduce “acting the song” through initial reactions and lyric analysis, analyze the lyrics to an unfamiliar song and view the live performance

Closing: Perform songs for the class and receive instructor and classmate critiques, implement initial reactions into performance

 

Using The Class Plan

Please Note: Both Age Groups (if applicable) will follow the same class plan structure and content. The content delivery will  be tailored to the age group.